New Classes

£10 per person

Monday: 9:00am-10:00am restorative
Tuesday: 6:30pm-7:30pm open level vinyasa flow
Friday: 3:00pm-4:00pm restorative
Saturday: 3:30pm-4:30pm beginners vinyasa flow
Saturday: 4:45pm-6:00pm intermediate vinyasa flow (some experience needed)

Call 0208 7672266 to book

Rechere’s Health, Education and Well-Being Centre
163-165 Tooting high street SW17 0SY

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How does Yoga support Pregnant Women Energetically?

Unlike other prenatal exercise classes yoga focuses on the whole being of mother and baby, not just the physical side of Pregnancy and Birth.

Yoga empowers women to listen to their own bodies and to make choices based on their inner feelings. Learning how to quiet the mind through meditative practices and listen to the true self is vital when the world suddenly thinks it’s okay to throw advise at you.

Yoga has a focus on union and oneness so it naturally helps mum and baby connect. Mum can let go of expectations and pressures of ego driven behaviour and slow down, stop pushing to achieve and take a gentler approach to just be, as one with the baby.

Learning about how prana moves in and around the body can prenatal-teachinghelp a woman make sense of the changes that are happening both physically and emotionally. Accepting and allowing the ebb and flow of energy to be a guide, connecting with the inner self to choose what she feels is needed without judgement.

Linking with the elements will give mum a feeling of connectedness with mother-nature. Reminding her that we are all made up of these elements, part of nature, alleviating anxiety and a feeling of disconnectedness felt by women as the process of birth had become so medicalised and far removed. Yoga works to balance the elements and nourish the body through prana, working on all 5 koshas to encourage mental, emotional and energetic stability ready to start a new life – to be reborn themselves as a mother.

Tadasana (Mountain Pose)

The foundation pose of our practice, the body completely balanced, calm, steady and focused. Yet, it often turns into fidgeting, hair flicking, clothes adjusting and general lack of focus.

For some reason this pose is neglected and almost discounted by many students and sometimes even teachers! So lets give it some love and really get to grips with it.

  • Standing at the front of the mat, feet together, big toe joints touching, heels slightly apart.
  • Spread the toes without gripping the floor, weight evenly distributed through the points of the feet, arches lifted. (yogi toes)
  • There is a feeling of grounding into the floor, whilst growing and extending through the body, as though the crown of the head is attatched to an imaginary string from the ceiling.
  • Firm the thighs without locking the knees (be extra careful if you have hyperextended knees) Gently rotate the upper thighs towards the centre line and lift the kneecaps.
  • Balance the pelvis in a neutral position, as though you have a bowl of water in the pelvis and you don’t want to spill it.
  • Draw the front ribs in, whilst lifting the sternum towards the sky – opening the chest and widening the collarbones.
  • Roll the shoulders down and back to relax them and allow them to sit with ease and avoiding excessive downward motion. Shoulder blades slide down the back.
  • Let the arms hang naturally, with energy throughout, all the way to the fingertips.
  • Keep the neck long and chin parallel to the floor. Drishti can vary depending upon the school but a forward, neutral position with a soft gaze is common.

so…what’s samasthiti? Is it the same as tadasana? If you’ve ever attended an Astanga class you will definately have heard this term. Many student don’t really know the difference and it never seems to be explained! Basically Tadasana is the name of the asana, whereas Samasthiti is more the essence of the asana – the focus. Samasthiti roughly translates as ‘establishing an equal and steady posture’… Personally I believe Tadasana should always be Samathiti. That focus on balance and stability should always be emphasised to keep the medatative quality to the flow. This emphasis would eliminate the tendency for students to unwittingly use it as more of a pit stop – just a little break, where all focus is lost.

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You’ve finished your Yoga Teacher Training…but can you actually teach?

teaching 1It has been nearly a month since I completed my 200hrs Yoga Teacher Training with YogaLondon (highly recommended). The first few days I was on a high – I’d just graduated and felt I was ready to launch myself into teaching. A week later I was full of doubts!

‘You’ve finished your YTT… but can you actually teach real people?’ This was what was going round and round in my head. Friends and family had become fed up of being experimented on relentlessly during my training, so any teaching practice since had involved teaching my imaginary student, using my loud teacher voice, in the living room whilst my cat was either trying to sleep on my mat or join in. I’m pretty sure the neighbours think I’m insane!

I was starting to feel quite panicky about the prospect of teaching my first class. What if I just freeze? What if I can’t remember my sequencing? What if my class is boring and my students don’t want to come back? What if? What if?

So what actually happened? Arriving I felt quite anxious but setting up the room and greeting the students I somehow lost all those fears and doubts. It was amazing, I absolutely loved teaching. I felt prepared, nothing I had predicted happened. The class went well, with a nice flow and all the students worked really hard. It wasn’t a struggle, it just felt so natural. I had managed to offer appropriate modifications and alternative asana for those with injuries,everyone was smiling. The feedback I got at the end of class was really positive, everyone said they enjoyed it and even asked if I taught other classes!I couldn’t have asked for a better experience.

5 Things about teaching my first class.

  • When you are not talking, it is very silent – this can be disconcerting, but remember – when you are participating in class the silence is nice. The students like to have a bit of space and time to just be, to explore the asana and how it feels.
  • If you ask a question, it’s likely no-one will say anything at first. This is okay, just carry on, they do start responding once you gain their trust!
  • Don’t be afraid to challenge your students – emphasising the process of exploring where their individual challenges are and working on those. It’s the journey – not the destination.
  • In savasana some people won’t close their eyes. That’s okay…it might make you feel uncomfortable, like you are being watched BUT it’s better the student feels comfortable! This is their time, you don’t want them feeling on edge! Hopefully in time they will learn to feel safe in the space and completely relax.
  • My favourite moment? Bringing them out of savasana – everyone looks so peaceful. Bringing the awareness back to the body, wiggling their toes and fingers, it’s amazing to see these tiny movements as they reconnect.teaching 2

So if you are prone to anxiety, like me, and you have just qualified then really don’t worry. It is completely normal to have some doubts and fears but dont let the what if’s stop you.”Paralysis by over analysis is deadly” Assuming you’ve had good quality training there really is nothing to worry about.

Good Luck – Harri x

What are the 8 Limbs of Yoga?

Here I am going to give a general overview of the 8 fold path set out by Patanjali in ‘The Yoga Sutras’ (Ashtanga – 8 limb…. not to be confused with Ashtanga Vinyasa which is the set of sequences devised in Mysore by Patabi Jois)

‘The Yoga Sutras’ aims to explain; what yoga is, the aim of yoga, how to achieve this, what might get in your way, how to overcome these obstacles and what the result could be. It is non-dogmatic and each sutra (thread) is open to interpretation. The 8 limbs are almost like an action plan!

  1. Yamas – Ethical considerations
  2. Niyamas – Self observations
  3. Asana – Physical postures
  4. Pranayama – Breath control
  5. Pratyahara – Withdrawal of senses
  6. Dharana – Concentration
  7. Dhyana – Meditation
  8. Samadhi – Freedom/Enlightenment

Firstly we need to consider our ethics, through understanding the 5 Yamas: Continue reading